History of the Statue of Liberty

UnknownThis statue is a symbol of America and is known throughout the world. Many visitors come to New York just to view her in person. She was a gift from the people of France in 1886. During immigration, the statue became an icon of freedom for those arriving from other countries. Here are some facts you may not know about Lady Liberty.

  • 1984-1986: The statue was closed for restoration. The torch and much of the internal structure were replaced.
  • After 9/11, it was closed for safety reasons and was reopened in 2009 for limited visitors.
  • Liberty Island fully opened July 4, 2013
  • Nobody has been able to access the balcony on the torch since 1916
  • The French paid for the statue but the US paid for the pedestal on which it stands
  • There are differing opinions in how much copper was needed for the statue. Some say 200,000 lbs while another says 128,000 lbs.
  • The cost of the donated copper was $16,000 at that time (Around $354,000 in 2014).
  • American fundraising for the statue included a young Theodore Roosevelt
  • Designer of the Eiffel tower, Gustave Eiffel, also helped on the Statue of Liberty
  • To protect the copper skin on the statue, Gustave Eiffel insulated it with asbestos
  • Many Americans at the time preferred realistic artwork rather than allegorical like the Statue of Liberty
  • The proposed height of the pedestal was 114 feet, it was reduced to 89 feet
  • Some people donated as little as 5 cents towards the pedestal
  • The tradition of the ticker-tape parade started during the parade for the Statue of Liberty when traders at the NYSE threw ticker tape from the windows
  • A fireworks display was planned for the Statue of Liberty’s arrival, but it was postponed due to bad weather
  • Replacement copper for some repairs came from a rooftop at Bell Labs
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